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Psychology Course Descriptions

PSY 1010 Introductory Psychology
3 credits
An introductory overview of the scientific study of behavior. Numerous topics within the field of psychology are surveyed. Possible topics include biological bases of behavior, perception, language and thinking, learning and memory, development of behavior through the lifespan, personality, social interactions and influences, dysfunctional behavior, emotions, and psychotherapy. Distribution Requirement: BSS.

PSY 1879 Psychology as a Science and Profession
3 credits
A transition from introductory psychology to more specialized courses, meant for new psychology majors. Covers two facets of the discipline of psychology: its scientific nature and its real world application. Approximately half of the course will be devoted to scientific ways of understanding psychological phenomena, with the remainder of the course focused on professional careers and applications. Prerequisite: PSY1010. Offered Term II.

PSY 2020 Introduction to Clinical Psychology
3 credits
A survey of the field of clinical psychology that includes: discussions of graduate study in the field; professional roles of clinical psychologists and inherent challenges in each of them; ethical issues in practice, research, education, diagnostic instruments and their use; theoretical models of practice; and therapeutic techniques. Prerequisites: PSY 1010. PSY 2030 Personality 3 credits A study of different ways in which psychologists have described, measured, and explained personality. Personality development and differences among individuals are considered by examining several theories and research evidence. Prerequisite: PSY 1010.

PSY 2060 Child and Adolescent Psychology
3 credits
A study of basic facts, issues, and methods of inquiry in human development from conception to adolescence. Topics include physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Prerequisite: PSY 1010.

PSY-BIO 2141 Animal Behavior
4 credits
Describes and compares the typical behaviors of various nonhuman species, and considers of the influence of genetics, evolution, physiology, environment and learning in determining those behavior patterns. Topics include aggression, social attachment, reproduction, communication, and altruism, as well as various theoretical approaches to understanding animal behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. Distribution Requirement: PLS. Offered Term I.

PSY-WMS 2150 Psychology of Women
3 credits
This course takes a lifespan and thematic approach to the female experience. Topics include sexual dimorphism, childhood experiences, role identification, moral development, sexuality, motherhood, career options, aging, and the interplay of gender and psychological disorders. Prerequisites: Any of the following: PSY 1010, SOC 1010, or WMS 1000.

PSY 2410 Psychology of Interpersonal Relations
3 credits
Provides, through text materials and class exercises, a basis for understanding human interaction. Topics include verbal and nonverbal communication, role-specific behavior, style and forms of interaction, and conflict resolution.

PSY 2602 Quantitative Methods in Psychology
3 credits
Statistical procedures are the tools used by psychologists to analyze and interpret experimental findings. This course provides an introduction to the most frequently encountered techniques for describing data and making inferences in psychological research. In addition, it introduces the use of SPSS for Statistical Analysis. Prerequisites: PSY 1010, college algebra or equivalent. This course is intended for Psychology majors only.

PSY 2650 The Psychology of Learning
3 credits
An overview of learning theory from the perspective of both human and animal research. Offered Term II.

PSY-CRJ 2670 Forensic Psychology
3 credits
A survey of the relationship between psychology and the law. Topics to be covered include psychological aspects of policing, mental health issues in criminal justice, behavioral approaches to trial preparation, and forensic assessment. Prerequisites: PSY 1010. Offered Terms I and II.

PSY 2800 Health Psychology
3 credits
This course surveys the newly emerging field of behavior and health. Topics covered include the psychology of health care and research; psychoneuroimmunology; issues of stress, pain and coping; the role of behavior and chronic disease (heart, AIDS, cancer, etc.); and behavioral health (the use of tobacco, drugs, extreme eating control measures, and exercise). Prerequisite: PSY 1010.

PSY 3000 Adult Development and Aging
3 credits
A study of the psychological changes that occur with maturing and aging. Adult development is examined with special emphasis on the physical, emotional, social and cognitive changes that occur from early adulthood through death. Life transitions, problems in contemporary society, and methods of coping are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. Highly recommended: PSY 2060.

PSY 3010 Social Psychology
3 credits
A review of contemporary thinking and research on the ways in which people affect one another in various social situations. Topics include the formation of social impressions, the development of attitudes and beliefs, interpersonal influence, conformity, stereotyping and prejudice, aggression, helping, interpersonal attraction and love, and group behavior. Prerequisite: Introductory course in one of the social sciences, health sciences, education, or Criminal Justice.

PSY 3030 Cultural Psychology
3 credits
A survey of the concepts, theoretical perspectives, methodological complexities, and empirical findings relevant to the psychological study of culture. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 and junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

PSY 3080 Experimental Psychology
3 credits
A development of skills necessary to conduct experimental research and to communicate research results in standard form. Students write reports of experimental research carried out in class and of an original research project conducted outside the classroom. Prerequisite: PSY 2602. Fulfills W-Course Requirement.

PSY 3100 Physiological Psychology
3 credits
A study of the biological, genetic, neurochemical, and evolutionary bases of behavior. This course involves an exploration of the nervous system, specifically examining the ways in which it receives, processes, and integrates information so as to produce coordinated sensory, cognitive, and motor experiences. It further examines the results of damage and diseases of the nervous system. Prerequisites: PSY1010 and an introductory course in biology or permission of the instructor.

PSY 3110 Psychological Testing
3 credits
Equal emphasis is given to test construction theory and applications of psychological tests and measurements. Topics include measurement theory, statistical procedures, methods of scoring, interpretation of results, and evaluation of instruments for a variety of purposes (clinical, counseling, educational, and industrial). Experience is provided with group and individual tests. Prerequisites: PSY 2602.

PSY 3210 Child Psychopathology
3 credits
An examination of child psychological disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders, ADHD, learning disabilities, disruptive behavior disorders, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorders. The course will emphasize recent research on the characteristics and causes of these disorders, as well as how professionals assess, diagnose, and treat children with these disorders. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 and PSY 2060 is recommended. Offered Terms I and II.

PSY 3220 Theories of Human Development
3 credits
This course examines the major theories and theoretical perspectives that have shaped thought and scholarship throughout the history of developmental psychology. Included will be the psychoanalytic tradition, behavioral and social learning models, cognitive-developmental theory, information-processing theories, humanistic conceptions of the self, ecological and ethnological perspectives, perceptual-development theory, theories of moral development, and cultural-psychological perspectives. Prerequisites: PSY 1010. PSY 2060 highly recommended.

PSY-HMS 3300 Basic Counseling Techniques
3 credits
This course will assist students to acquire basic skills or techniques used in one-on-one counseling sessions by professional counselors. In addition to practicing interventions in simulated situations, topics of study include the role(s) of the professional helper, ethics in counseling, multicultural issue, and working with special populations. The course is required for Human Services majors and is an elective for Criminal Justice major. It is especially appropriate for those who intend to enter a helping field. Prerequisite: PSY 1010, junior and senior class status, or permission of instructor. Offered Term I and Term II.

PSY 3410 Cognitive Psychology
3 credits
A concentration on the study of human information processing. Students learn about research evidence and theories which explain the thought process. Prerequisite: PSY 2060, PSY 2030 is recommended.

PSY 4010 History and Systems of Psychology
3 credits
A study of the historical development of psychological thought and its philosophical antecedents. The major schools and systems are reviewed with emphasis on biographical analysis so that the history of psychology may be seen in the lives, ideas and works of leaders in the field. Prerequisites: Declared major in psychology and multiple courses completed in psychology, or permission of the instructor.

PSY 4031 Contemporary Problems
3 credits
A variety of current topics and issues in psychology which are not included in other courses. Usually, one particular topic is studied at an advanced level. Prerequisites: Upperclass standing and multiple Psychology courses. Specific topics vary each term.

PSY 4080 Advanced Research Methods
3 credits
A research experience emphasizing the integration of material from previous research courses. Involves conducting, writing, and presenting an original data-based psychological study. Prerequisites: PSY 2602 and PSY 3080.

PSY 4590 Advanced Seminar
3 credits
A detailed study of an advanced topic in psychology pursued in the seminar format. The emphasis is on independent scholarly activity by the student, including seminar leadership. Topics vary, but typically represent a synthesis of differing viewpoints and strategies to accommodate the interests and strengths of individual students and the instructor. This course is designed primarily as a capstone experience for advanced psychology majors. Prerequisite: Upperclass standing in psychology or permission of the instructor. Fulfills W-Course Requirement.